Meet Sharie Valcin, NAHA 2021 Avant Garde Winner!
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Meet Sharie Valcin, NAHA 2021 Avant Garde Winner!

We sit down with NAHA 2021 Avant Garde winner, Sharie Valcin, to discuss her inspirations and what we should be giving thought to during #BlackHistoryMonth.

 

Describing her time with clients as “hairapy” sessions, Sharie Valcin has created a safe space for her clients to sit in her chair to confide in her and vice versa. Being in the position to encourage and uplift others is her main motivation to be in the beauty industry with making their hair beautiful as an added bonus. She believes that God gifted her the talent to do hair because of her love of connection and encouraging others. As a true advocate for texture education in the industry, we connect with Sharie for Black History Month to discuss diversity and inclusivity.  

 

What does being a black beauty professional mean to you? 

I feel it is my responsibility as well as all beauty professionals of color to use our influence to continue to push hair diversity. Having the ability to continually learn and work with various textures has allowed become a more well-rounded stylist. I pay it forward by educating other upcoming beauty professionals, allowing them to be more comfortable working with all textures. It is important that we continue to normalize the representation of black women and textured hair in salons, the editorial world, and mainstream media.

 

"It is important that we continue to normalize the representation of black women and textured hair in salons, the editorial world, and mainstream media."

 

What is something you feel the beauty industry needs to focus on or learn to continue to work towards diversity or inclusivity? 

As this industry continues to grow and evolve, I think it’s important that we represent textured hair and black culture in all cosmetology schools. A good start would be incorporating more courses related to texture and requiring all graduating students to have more hands-on experience with all hair types as well as basic product knowledge for different curl patterns. Salons should also make it a point to make sure all staff is well versed with textured hair to eliminate client bias.


Where do you hope the beauty industry can go in the future?  

I hope to see more summits and large organizations formed to further unite beauty professionals of color within the industry. I think it is important to build a community that fosters inclusivity and encourages opportunities for better representation on a larger scale. 

What is something you would want to say to future black beauty professionals? 

  1. Be authentic and unapologetically you. Never alter or dilute who you are to fit someone else’s mold.  
  2. Don’t be afraid to reach out to other black beauty industry professionals and influencers for guidance.  
  3. Remain a student.  Always be open to opportunities to connect and acquire knowledge.  

 

"I think it is important to build a community that fosters inclusivity and encourages opportunities for better representation on a larger scale. "

- Sharie Valcin

 

Follow Sharie Valcin on Instagram @hairbysharie84.
Category:
  • Member Stories
Published On: Feb 16, 2022
Be authentic and unapologetically you. Never alter or dilute who you are to fit someone else’s mold.

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