Meet NAHA 2022 Texture and Styling and Finishing Finalist, Jamal Edmonds!
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Meet NAHA 2022 Texture and Styling and Finishing Finalist, Jamal Edmonds!

PBA talks with Jamal Edmonds on #BlackHistoryMonth to explore his passion for diversity and inclusion in the beauty space.

 

Jamal Edmonds entered the beauty industry at 17 years old, inspired by the glitz and glam and the golden promise of success. Now at 45, his motivations have changed to create a safe place for women of color and develop services that were once overlooked. For Jamal, educating the industry on understanding that hair should be viewed as a fabric, remains to be his source of passion. A NAHA 2022 finalist for both “Texture” and “Styling and Finishing” categories, an inspiring educator, and prominent master stylist, Jamal Edmonds continues to be a notable leader in the industry. PBA talks with him during Black History Month to explore what diversity inclusion means to him in the beauty space.

 

What does being a black beauty professional mean to you? 

Being a black beauty professional means that I use my platform to educate and have uncomfortable conversations. It also means that try to inspire and motivate stylists through education and my work.

 

"It’s about creating a safe place for women of color and creating services that were once overlooked or never thought about."

 

What is something you feel the beauty industry needs to focus on or learn to continue to work towards diversity or inclusivity? 

I feel like the beauty industry should work on creating education for all texture types. In my opinion diversity and inclusion should start in beauty schools and in the textbook.


Where do you hope the beauty industry can go in the future?  

In the future, I would like to see a more well-rounded beauty industry in terms of education and skill set. It’s okay to specialize in styling, color or etc. but beauty professionals should be able to service any client that enters a salon. 

What is something you would want to say to future black beauty professionals? 

I would like to tell future black beauty professionals that the industry is moving forward and to be patient. More change is coming!

 

"Beauty professionals should be able to service any client that enters a salon."

- Jamal Edmonds

 

Follow Jamal Edmonds on Instagram @lamajbackwards.
Category:
  • Member Stories
Published On: Feb 23, 2022

Diversity and inclusion should start in beauty schools and in the textbook.

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